Do I Need Glasses? (10 Signs You Might Need to See an Eye Doctor)

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Your eyes change over time, so you may not even realize that you need glasses. Common symptoms of needing glasses includes headaches, eye aches, and squinting. The best way to know for sure if you need glasses is to find an optometrist nearby and schedule a comprehensive eye exam

If you are experiencing sudden loss of vision or eye pain, it is important to have it looked into immediately. An eye doctor is the only person who will be able to confirm if you need glasses.

10 Signs You Need Glasses | Time to see an Optometrist for a Eye Exam

  1. Blurred vision
  2. Difficulty seeing at night
  3. Trouble adjusting from dark to light
  4. Frequent headaches
  5. Difficulty with computer use
  6. Eye Strain or fatigue
  7. Seeing halos
  8. Double Vision
  9. Blurry vision such as nearsightedness or farsightedness 
  10. A pressure or strain sensation around the eyes
need glasses

Metrotown Optometrist – Best Rated Recommendations

Your vision changes as you age, and not every change in vision is abnormal. When you reach your 40’s, the natural internal lens in your eye becomes less flexible. This means they are unable to focus as easily from near to far. When this happens, your near vision gets worse and you may be wondering if you need reading glasses. Trouble seeing smaller print in low light, eyes hurting when trying to read or do other close work are a few signs that your near vision is changing.

If you’re experiencing any of these symptoms, book an appointment to see an Optometrist nearby. Even if you are not having the above symptoms, it is recommended to see an eye doctor for regular eye exams to ensure you are seeing clearly and to keep up to date on your eye health.

If the results indicate you need glasses, your optometrist can advise you on what would be best for your condition.  

Medical Masks vs Cloth Masks | 5 Effective ways to use protective masks

Posted: Nov, 10 3:30 AM PT | Last updated Nov 10, 2020

Should I Wear a Face Mask When Visiting My Eye Doctor at Metrotown?

The College of Optometrists of BC advise the use of medical masks by patients while in the clinic since physical distancing may not be possible throughout testing and assessment. Each patient and visitor is required to wear a medical mask while in our office to limit the spread of COVID-19.

Which Types of Masks are Best Rated?

Medical Masks should be used as part of a comprehensive strategy of measures to suppress transmission and save lives; the use of a mask alone is not sufficient to provide an adequate level of protection against COVID-19.

Medical masks or procedure masks are flat or pleated have a barrier to stop spreading droplets and are fixed snug to the head with straps. Wearing a medical mask is one of the prevention methods to limit the transmission of COVID-19.

Cloth masks reduce the spread of large respiratory droplets when you sneeze or cough. However, these masks offer minimal protection to the wearer.



Visiting Our Metrotown Optometrist Team

During your visit with the Real Eyes Optometry team in Burnaby. Our Optometrists Dr. Shaun Pati, Dr. Amit Sahota and Dr. Tony Wang use medical grade masks. We use plexiglass on our eye care equipment for face to face interactions and ensure everyone’s safety.

For patients who do not have the required 3 layer filtration system masks, we have you covered and are selling them in office.




Make Sure You Have the Right Mask. Stay Safe – Real Eyes Optometry


Coronavirus face medical masks FAQs
  • How effective are neck gaiters?
  • How effective are bandanas?
  • What’s the right way to wear a face mask?
  • When should masks be worn?
  • Can I make my own cloth mask?

Check out the BC CDC Face Mask List for answers to the above.

Wear your Mask Correctly

  • Wash your hands or use hand sanitizer before putting on your mask.
  • Put the mask over your nose and mouth and secure it under your chin.
  • Fit the mask snugly against the sides of your face, slipping the loops over your ears or tying the strings behind your head.
  • If you have to continually adjust your mask, it doesn’t fit properly, and you might need to find a different mask type or brand.
  • Make sure you can breathe easily.

Take Off Your Mask Carefully, When You’re Home

  • Untie the strings behind your head or stretch the ear loops
  • Handle only by the ear loops or ties
  • Fold outside corners together
  • Place mask in the washing machine
  • Be careful not to touch your eyes, nose, and mouth when removing and wash your hands immediately after removing.

Will masks become the ‘new normal’ even after the pandemic has passed

Some countries have shifted their cultures and embraced mask-wearing in public places, transportation or in crowded shopping malls, when individuals are feeling a bit under the weather. For those with auto-immune diseases, that would be a positive shift.

It is possible to curb COVID flare-ups, protect immunocompromised people who can’t develop full immunity and benefit us all by staving off the flu and other viral illnesses through use of medical masks. Of course, we all know it’s not that simple: Masks have been a point of contention since the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention started recommending their use. Some people acknowledge that they have been forever changed by the pandemic, particularly when it comes to hygiene practices like hand-washing and masks.

When we are all willing to wear masks, even just in certain situations, the mask both loses its stigma and gains power to protect all of us from both big threats like Covid-19, and smaller threats like the flu. One day in the near future, mask-wearing can signal that we care about others’ health, and about our own.

Blue Blocker Lenses and Beating the Blue Light Blues

Blue Blocker Lenses

Blue Blocker Lenses and Beating the Blue Light Blues

You are exposed to all kinds of light and other forms of electromagnetic radiation everyday from sources such as sunlight, fluorescent lights, computers, laptops, smartphones, and TV. Blue blocker lenses are used to reduce the amount of blue light your eyes are exposed to every day.

What is Blue-Violet Light?

Blue-violet light is the most energetic out of all the light that can be seen by the human eye, also known as the visible spectrum. You already know the visible spectrum if you can name the colours of the rainbow (hint: ROYGBIV).

What Makes Blue Light Different?

Blue-violet light has the highest energy because it has the shortest wavelength on the electromagnetic spectrum because energy and wavelength are inversely related. That means the shorter the wavelength, the higher the energy and vice versa.  The wavelengths of the visible spectrum range from approximately 400-700 nanometers (nm).

So red light, at around 700 nm, has the least energy and blue light, at around 400 nm, has the most.

What is Ultraviolet Light?

Even more powerful than Blue-Violet light is Ultraviolet Light, X-Rays, and Gamma Rays. Ultraviolet light, also known as UV light, is invisible to the human eye and can cause cancer! It’s the reason why we wear sunblock and sunglasses when we’re out in the sun and its wavelengths range from around 10-380 nm.

The Good

Ever notice how a little sunshine can improve your mood? That’s because moderate exposure to certain types of blue light is essential to your well-being, and along with elevating your mood, it can make you feel more alert and even help with memory. Blue light exposure also keeps your biological clock ticking on time – one of the biggest sources of blue light is the sun, and when it sets, your body takes the hint that it’s time to start getting ready for a restful night of sleep.

Blue Blocker Lenses
What we call light is only a small range on the spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, which also includes radio waves, microwaves, ultraviolet rays, X-rays, and the previously mentioned gamma rays. (Images provided by Dr. Shaun Pati)

The Bad

Prolonged and constant exposure to blue light can cause your eyes discomfort such as strain and glare. Also, since blue light is important in regulating our circadian rhythms by letting our body’s natural clock know when it’s time to sleep, too much blue light exposure right before bed will negatively affect the quality of your sleep and can make you feel more tired and less alert the next day. This is becoming an increasing issue as some of the main sources of blue light (aside from the sun) are our electronic devices (such as your smartphone, notebook, TV, and computer). That’s why you should use blue blocker lenses and think twice about using your phone and computer right before bed!

The Ugly

Blue light exposure puts you at increased risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration, especially for people over the age of 50. This condition, which affects the part of the retina known as the macula, is non-curable and affects the sharpness and clarity of your central vision, which you depend on to drive and read. Too much exposure to UV light can cause cataracts and even temporary blindness (known as photokeratitis) due to sunburns on the cornea. Just another reason why you should NEVER stare directly at the sun!

What Can You do?

You can’t (and shouldn’t) try to avoid all blue light, but instead take steps to reduce your exposure with blue blocker lenses. This can take on many forms- from reducing your time staring at a screen (especially right before bed), to using blue blocking lenses as filters. At Real Eyes Optometry, we recommend using Crizal Prevencia No Glare lenses which not only blocks harmful blue light (while letting the good blue light through), it also offers comprehensive UV protection.

If you use Sun block for your skin, you should use Blue blocker lenses for your eyes. It’s that simple.

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